More Americans are Dying Accidental Deaths

A new report from the National Safety Council found that in 2014, more than 136,000 Americans died accidentally. That represents an increase of 4.2 percent from 2013 and over 15.5 percent from a decade before. This news comes despite the fact that there has been a 22 percent decrease in automobile fatalities since 2005. An American dies of an accidental injury every four minutes.

Overdoses and accidental poisonings have overtaken car wrecks as the biggest accidental killer in America. Overdoses and poisonings killed over 42,000 people in 2014, which is about 6,000 more than were killed by automobile accidents. In addition, falls are up more than 63 percent in a decade, which many experts attribute to the aging population.

The three biggest killers in America remain heart disease, cancer, and lower respiratory diseases. However, unintentional injuries have beaten out strokes, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, flu, and suicide to become the fourth leading killer in the U.S. Many people believe that murders are common, but there are actually eight accidental deaths for every murder. The good news is the decline in automobile fatalities – far fewer teenagers and young adults are dying on the roads than were just a few short decades ago.

This sobering report illustrates the dangers of serious accidents. Fortunately, for those involved in serious accidents, help is available through the legal system. If you have been involved in an accident, call the Plano personal injury attorneys at the Barber Law Firm at 972-231-5800. We can help. You may be entitled to compensation for your medical expenses, lost wages, pain and suffering, and more. Call us today to learn more or to schedule a free consultation.

 

 

 

The post More Americans are Dying Accidental Deaths appeared first on Barber Law Firm | Personal Injury Lawyers & Car Accident Attorneys.

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